What are just some of the toxins the EPA and other researchers found in inside air?

Benzene from paint, new carpet, new drapes and upholstery
Ammonia in tobacco smoke and cleaning supplies
Chloroform from paint, new carpet, new drapes and upholstery
Formaldehyde from tobacco smoke, plywood, cabinets, furniture, particleboard, office dividers, new carpet, new drapes, wallpaper, etc.
Sulphur dioxide, cyanide, and carbon monoxide from tobacco smoke
Trichloroethylene from paints, glues, furniture and wallpaper
Carbon tetrachloride from paints, new drapes, new carpet and cleaning supplies
Nitrogen dioxide from stoves, furnaces
Radon gas entering through foundations
Pollen from plants and trees
Mold spores from moisture and bacteria
Dust mites from dust and bacteria
Bacteria from all areas of the home

 


What are just some of the toxins the EPA and other researchers found in inside air?

Benzene – increases the risk of cancer and other illnesses, and is also a notorious cause of bone marrow failure.
Ammonia - irritating to the eyes and mucous membranes (respiratory and digestive tracts), and to a lesser extent the skin
Chloroform from paint, new carpet, new drapes and upholstery
Formaldehyde - Because formaldehyde resins are used in many construction materials it is one of the more common indoor air pollutants. in view of its widespread use, toxicity, and volatility, formaldehyde poses a significant danger to human health. In 2011, the US National Toxicology Program described formaldehyde as "known to be a human carcinogen”.
Sulphur dioxide, cyanide, and carbon monoxide from tobacco smoke – Highly toxic or lethal to humans,
Trichloroethylene - Beyond the effects to the central nervous system, workplace exposure to trichloroethylene has been associated with toxic effects in the liver and kidney.
Carbon tetrachloride - Exposure to high concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (including vapor) can affect the central nervous system, degenerate the liver[8] and kidneys[14] and may result (after prolonged exposure) in coma and even death.
Nitrogen dioxide from stoves, furnaces

 


What are just some of the toxins the EPA and other researchers found in inside air?

Radon gas - According to a 2003 report EPA's Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes from the United States Environmental Protection Agency, epidemiological evidence shows a clear link between lung cancer and high concentrations of radon, with 21,000 radon-induced U.S. lung cancer deaths per year—second only to cigarette smoking.[3] Thus in geographic areas where radon is present in heightened concentrations, radon is considered a significant indoor air contaminant.
Pollen - Allergens
Mold spores - The most common health problem is an allergic reaction. Other problems are respiratory and/or immune system responses including respiratory symptoms, respiratory infections, exacerbation of asthma, and rarely hypersensitivity pneumonitis, allergic alveolitis, chronic rhinosinusitis and allergic fungal sinusitis.
Dust mites - associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma
Bacteria – gastrointestinal irrittion


Exposure to these chemicals resulted in: headaches, memory loss, slow poisoning pulmonary irritation, fatigue, drowsiness, eye, skin and nasal irritation, dizziness, depression, respiratory irritation, gynecological problems, shortness of breath, cancer and bronchial constriction. 

For the first time in history, it’s safer to be in the wilderness than in your own home. 

It’s alarming that indoor air has become so contaminate, especially when children are considered. Physiologically, they are more vulnerable to toxic vapors be cause of their higher metabolic rate. They breathe in more than twice as much oxygen (and therefore toxins) relative to body size than adults. They are more active, which increases their breathing rate and they play close to the floor where heavier pollutants settle. Modern school buildings that are shut tight have the same problems.